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MitchellB

United States
Joined 11/23/2009
55 Posts

11/28/2009 05:45:42  View MitchellB's MP3 Archive  View MitchellB's Photo Albums  Reply with Quote

I have a couple of repairs I need to make to my bass fiddle. I was wondering which glue gives the strongest bond on wood. Hide glue? Titebond carpenders glue? or ________? I have read that Hide Glue is the way to do. What do some of you more experienced luthiers think?

Rob

England
Joined 11/24/2009
3 Posts

11/29/2009 03:05:23  View Rob's Photo Albums  Reply with Quote

Hi Mitchell,

I cracked the side and top of my bass putting it in the car, my friend Phil Davidson who makes fantastic mandolins and banjos over here in England gave me some titebond and I have to say it has done a great job. He has all types of glue but he assured me that titebond was the best for repairs of this type. I am very interested to hear about other peoples experience.
Good luck with your repair
Rob

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Michael Brose

United States
Joined 11/19/2009
6 Posts

11/30/2009 15:58:46  View Michael Brose's Photo Albums  Click to see Michael Brose's MSN Messenger address  Reply with Quote

Hey guys! Nice to have our own place ain't it?? lol... my first Basshangout post. I've been apprenticing under a feller in Selmer TN building acoustic guitars, flat iron mandolins and Banjos and I've met a few noteable luthiers this year and each one of them use Tight Bond (among other things for different purposes but Tight bond in general). I was curious too because I used to use hide glue when I did ceartain repairs (fretboard replacement, peghead/ neck breaks) but I've been out of it a bit but it was a bit of a mess and smeeled about as good as fresh cow pies . Tight bond (not Tight Bond II) seems to be the choice because it's pretty much on there but if the need were to ever arise in the future you can remove the bond you make (great for fretboard's etc.) Good luck amigo! ( I am no "experienced luthier" but I am an "experienced tinkerer" hehe..

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Rob

England
Joined 11/24/2009
3 Posts

12/02/2009 04:39:21  View Rob's Photo Albums  Reply with Quote

Hi Mitchell,

Just to be sure we are talking about the same stuff, the glue I used is imported from the USA by my friend Phil and is called Franklyn's Titebond, I was not sure if titebond or tight bond is used as a generic term for a type of glue.

Best
Rob

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jhowell

United States
Joined 11/26/2009
2 Posts

12/02/2009 18:32:30  Reply with Quote

I'm new here, but have a couple of acoustic guitar builds under my belt. My opinion is that TiteBond is fine, though I tend to not use it too much. Hot hide glue is my prefered glue for things that can be clamped up fairly fast -- under 60 seconds. I use it for the bracing, gluing down the bridge, joining the back and top pieces, etc. For things that take more time, I like LMII's instrument maker's glue. It's a white glue that dries hard as glass. It's drawback is that it has a shelf life of about six months.

lmii.com/CartTwo/thirdproducts...kers+glue

Hope the link makes it. Also hopes this helps a bit!

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Longstring

United States
Joined 11/20/2009
8 Posts

12/04/2009 14:17:38  View Longstring's Photo Albums  Reply with Quote

If you are talking acoustic then please don't use anything but hide glue. If it ever need repair again it can be undone. Tite bond, white, carpenters,yellow or any other name you want to call alphenic resin glue can be use on solid body guitars and bases. Guitar, mando, banjo luthiers use alphenic all the time. Violin/fiddle, cello, upright bass luthiers stick them together with hide glue.

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sgtp3pp3r

United States
Joined 12/7/2009
22 Posts

12/07/2009 17:16:05  Reply with Quote

quote:
Originally posted by Longstring

If you are talking acoustic then please don't use anything but hide glue. If it ever need repair again it can be undone. Tite bond, white, carpenters,yellow or any other name you want to call alphenic resin glue can be use on solid body guitars and bases. Guitar, mando, banjo luthiers use alphenic all the time. Violin/fiddle, cello, upright bass luthiers stick them together with hide glue.



LMII's White Instrument Glue can be undone for repairs as well - it softens with the application of heat just like Hide Glue. I've been using this stuff on all my instruments since 2003 - including several acoustic guitars.

--Steve

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jhowell

United States
Joined 11/26/2009
2 Posts

12/07/2009 18:23:01  Reply with Quote

Yup, most glues are reversible. I use epoxy to put fret boards on steel string guitar necks to keep water out of the joint -- don't want even the slightest twist in there and a cured epoxy joint will come apart at about 160 degrees -- still safe for the finish. Lots of guitars have been built with original Tite Bond with no problems at all. I use HHG for things like bracing, neck and tail blocks and the bridge, but revert to LMII for kerfed linings and closing the box -- anything that I cannot clamp in 60 seconds or less. Tite Bond is way better than HHG gone south with time.

--Jim

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Old Bassman

United States
Joined 1/3/2010
3 Posts

01/31/2010 16:13:55  View Old Bassman's Photo Albums  Reply with Quote

DO NOT, repeat DO NOT use ANY non-reversable glue on ANY acoustic wooden instrument! Hide glue (the powdered kind that you mix and heat in glue pots) is the ONLY kind used by the master builders. Gorilla Glue and the like will repair the ax ONE time, but the next time it needs repairing the wood will splinter instead of coming apart. Probably not too good for acoustic properties either.

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woodwiz

Joined 3/4/2010
6 Posts

03/13/2010 08:27:16  View woodwiz's Blog  Reply with Quote

PLEASE, only hot hide glue on upright bass repairs. Uprights take a lot of abuse, and need frequent repairs, Hide glue can be easily reversed, and unlike most other glues, will stick to itself so a joint can fairly easily be opened, and then all you have to do is apply a little fresh glue to reseal the joint. Plastic glues are a nightmare for the next guy.

Hide glue does not soften with heat, at least at any practical temperature. It does get brittle as the moisture is driven off, but I work with about a dozen professional luthiers, and have never seen one use heat to open a joint glued with hide glue.

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woodwiz

Joined 3/4/2010
6 Posts

03/13/2010 08:28:59  View woodwiz's Blog  Reply with Quote

quote:
Originally posted by woodwiz

PLEASE, only hot hide glue on upright bass repairs. Uprights take a lot of abuse, and need frequent repairs, Hide glue can be easily reversed, and unlike most other glues, will stick to itself so a joint can fairly easily be opened, and then all you have to do is apply a little fresh glue to reseal the joint. Plastic glues are a nightmare for the next guy.

Hide glue produces a bond that is plenty strong for the use, and it doesn't creep under strain like many plastic glues do.

Hide glue does not soften with heat, at least at any practical temperature. It does get brittle as the moisture is driven off, but I work with about a dozen professional luthiers, and have never seen one use heat to open a joint glued with hide glue.

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Steve Haynie

United States
Joined 11/24/2009
12 Posts

08/17/2010 12:13:08  Reply with Quote

A word about hide glue-- If you buy the bottles of Titebond hide glue look at the expiration date! The pre-made hide glue does not last forever.

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